Crazy Birds

While out and about in Costa Rica I was able to spy some pretty interesting birds. The distinguishing features for my favorites are their plumage colors and unique tail feathers. My favorite sighting was a quetzal in the family Trogonidae. I spotted the bird above us, but it was my hiking partner who was able to capture the better image of the bird before it flew off. Diego said this was one of only a handful of sightings in several years in that location.

A male quetzal. Copyright: Diego Lobo.

The next bird with beautiful plumage and unique tail feathers is a motmot. I think this one is a Blue-crowned motmot. Look at those tail feathers!

Blue-crowned motmot. Family ‎Momotidae. Copyright: Greg Joder.

The last fascinating bird I spotted was near my room. This one is in the family Cuculidae and is a squirrel cuckoo. As you can see, its distinguishing feature are its extra-long tail feathers with notable white tips.

Squirrel cuckoo (Piaya cayana). Copyright: Greg Joder.

 

 

serenity now

There’s a peacefulness here, though its purposeful, intentional on my part,  finding beauty in the simple things. Every morning I wake to the call of a Rufous-tailed hummingbird outside the bungalow and melodious songs of distant cryptic birds. There are photogenic spiders to admire and unique plants to photograph. I left my DSLR at home so all the photos are from my cell phone or my Lumix point-and-shoot camera. Not the best, but fun.

Green vine cascade. Copyright: Greg Joder. Click on photo for more flora images.
Horned-butt spider. Copyright: Greg Joder. Click on image for more bug photos.
Rufous-tailed Hummingbird. Copyright: Greg Joder. Click on image for more bird photos.

Mountain Lions of 2018

While I am still in Costa Rica, I wanted to share a short video of many, but not all, of the mountain lions my trail cameras captured in 2018. Not sure how many individuals are represented here, though I’m thinking around 8 or 9, based off location and physical characteristics. Feel free to comment if you have a guess or know an easy way to visually distinguish individuals. Enjoy!

Costa Rica on a Whim

The New Year brought me to Costa Rica for a short reboot. Hoping to start 2019 on a clear and heart-felt path. While most of my adventures have to do with nature, conservation and wildlife, this trip is focused on health and well-being. However, that hasn’t stopped my curiosity and desire to explore the natural world around me. Granted, I know very little about Costa Rican biodiversity, so the photos below have only the simplest of descriptions.

A few orchids:

A few insects:

I did not have my good DSLR, so the few bird photos I’ve taken so far are not that great:

Red passion flower. Copyright: Greg Joder.

 

 

 

2018, a Bit of a Review

2018 was an an interesting year in terms of wildlife adventures. Early on there was time on Operation Milagro, working with Sea Shepherd in their efforts to save the vaquita from extinction. Later in the year I was again onboard a Sea Shepherd ship on Operation Treasured Islands, a campaign in support of Mexican biologists studying everything from plankton and plastics to pacific mantas and Hammerhead sharks. As with previous stints with the organization, one of my main tasks was drone operator, as well as deck crew.

Most of the year I was home in Tucson keeping my eyes open for interesting wildlife and maintaining my own set of 10 camera traps. I also continued my informal, long-term (4+ years now) wildlife monitoring project at the The Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch of the National Audubon Society. This project also uses approximately 10 camera traps set up in strategic locations, such as water sources and wildlife trails in order to document what species may be present or just passing through the area.

In both cases, my cameras have captured fun videos and images of desert tortoises to Mountain lions.

Here’s to hoping 2019 brings more wildlife beauty and conservation moments and opportunities. Happy New Year!

A Band of White-nosed Coati

This trail cam capture was a fun surprise, a band of white-nosed coati foraging in a creek-bed. I set up the cameras about two weeks earlier, hoping to catch bears or mountain lions. I was happily surprised to see the cameras had captured the action of this band of coati as they worked their way down the creek. Pay close attention to the youngsters as they climb up and down trees and explore:

Desert Bighorn Sheep & A Bear

I don’t want to mislead everyone that my blog is all about trail camera captures. It is much more than that, given time. Currently, however, trail cameras have been a focus of my outdoor life (I’m not a hunter, but rather want to protect wildlife). I have other adventures in mind that will not involve trail cameras. I hope you’ll stick with me to see those adventures. In the mean time, I have more trail camera action to share with you. First, is a video of scouting a new location to set up a couple trail cameras:

Second are two videos that represent patience and luck when choosing a trail camera location.

A Desert Bighorn Sheep:

A Juvenile Black Bear: