Black Bears

When I first started camera trapping, mountain lions were my ultimate goal. It took me a few years to learn to track them and identify the best spots to place a camera in order to catch them in action. When that happened I was ecstatic. By chance, I had no idea I’d also be capturing lot’s of black bear activity.

That said, here are a few clips of black bears in action as captured by my cameras so far this year:

Monarch Caterpillar Morphs into Chrysalis

In the last week or so I finally starting seeing Monarch caterpillars on the milkweed in my pollinator garden. I counted about twenty in different instar states. Since then all the leaves of the milkweed have been eaten and the caterpillars have slinked off to find a safe place to hang out and morph into a chrysalis and eventually a butterfly. I was lucky enough to find one of the caterpillars in the classic “J” pose, ready to morph. The first video is filmed at normal speed so you can watch in detail the moments leading up to the emergence of the chrysalis. The second video compresses about 1/2 hour into about a minute and a half. Which ever video you watch, I recommend watching in 4k, full screen.

Camera Trapping

Camera traps are one of the best ways to observe wildlife behavior that you’d likely not see because it’s either dark out or your presence would alter the animals behavior. I bought my first camera trap around 2005 and was instantly addicted. I had no idea there were such shenanigans happening when I wasn’t around.

Mountain lion in the Sonoran Desert. Copyright: Greg Joder.

Now, in 2019, I have about 10 personal cameras set up in the desert around my home town, Tucson, including my backyard. I also have another 10 cameras set up at Audubon’s Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch near Elgin, Arizona. We use these cameras for long-term wildlife monitoring, recording which animals and how often pass through the research ranch.

In this post I’d like to share some backyard wildlife action my cameras recently captured.

A bobcat:

A coopers hawk:

A bat catching a sphinx moth at a cactus flower:

And a cute little western screech owl:

Hummingbird Nest in the Patio

For the third year and second time this summer a Broad-billed Hummingbird raised a new batch of hummingbirds in a re-used nest in my patio. Both the first clutch and the second (seen below) from this summer had two eggs, but only one from each clutch was viable and successfully fledged.

Female Broad-billed Hummingbird. Copyright: Greg Joder.

Here’s a photo of the two nestlings from last summer’s clutch:

A female Broad-billed hummingbird feeding her two nestlings. Copyright: Greg Joder.

Here’s a male Broad-billed hummingbird I photographed at one of my feeders, fully displaying his sexual dimorphism.

Male Broad-billed hummingbird at a feeder in Tucson, Arizona. Copyright: Greg Joder.

Finally, here’s a video of the female feeding her one nestling from the last clutch of this summer:

Crazy Birds

While out and about in Costa Rica I was able to spy some pretty interesting birds. The distinguishing features for my favorites are their plumage colors and unique tail feathers. My favorite sighting was a quetzal in the family Trogonidae. I spotted the bird above us, but it was my hiking partner who was able to capture the better image of the bird before it flew off. Diego said this was one of only a handful of sightings in several years in that location.

A male quetzal. Copyright: Diego Lobo.

The next bird with beautiful plumage and unique tail feathers is a motmot. I think this one is a Blue-crowned motmot. Look at those tail feathers!

Blue-crowned motmot. Family ‎Momotidae. Copyright: Greg Joder.

The last fascinating bird I spotted was near my room. This one is in the family Cuculidae and is a squirrel cuckoo. As you can see, its distinguishing feature are its extra-long tail feathers with notable white tips.

Squirrel cuckoo (Piaya cayana). Copyright: Greg Joder.

 

 

serenity now

There’s a peacefulness here, though its purposeful, intentional on my part,  finding beauty in the simple things. Every morning I wake to the call of a Rufous-tailed hummingbird outside the bungalow and melodious songs of distant cryptic birds. There are photogenic spiders to admire and unique plants to photograph. I left my DSLR at home so all the photos are from my cell phone or my Lumix point-and-shoot camera. Not the best, but fun.

Green vine cascade. Copyright: Greg Joder. Click on photo for more flora images.
Horned-butt spider. Copyright: Greg Joder. Click on image for more bug photos.
Rufous-tailed Hummingbird. Copyright: Greg Joder. Click on image for more bird photos.

Mountain Lions of 2018

While I am still in Costa Rica, I wanted to share a short video of many, but not all, of the mountain lions my trail cameras captured in 2018. Not sure how many individuals are represented here, though I’m thinking around 8 or 9, based off location and physical characteristics. Feel free to comment if you have a guess or know an easy way to visually distinguish individuals. Enjoy!