Butterflies

On my way to check my wildlife cameras in the Rincon Mountains near Tucson I came upon these butterflies. Does anyone know what plant this is?

Butterfly. Copyright: Greg Joder
Queen Butterfly. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Pipevine Swallowtail. Copyright: Greg Joder.

Hummingbird Nest Update

The little female Broad-billed Hummingbird continues to incubate her two eggs. She also performs a lot of nest maintenance each day, adding more material or adjusting what she already has.  In order to capture still images of her I set up my DSLR on a tripod with telephoto and on time-lapse, shooting one photo every minute.  Here are three of the best captures:

It’s hot out! Copyright: Greg Joder.
Nest material. Copyright: Greg Joder
Hunkered down. Copyright: Greg Joder.

More Wildlife

Despite the recent absence from my blog I have continued to capture photos and videos of things that interest me.  Most recently, I’ve been focused on Sonoran Desert nature.  Here are some favorite videos from the last few weeks.

Western Screech Owl and a Red-spotted Toad:

A Datura bloom time-lapse:

A Desert Kingsnake:

Round-tailed ground Squirrel Family:

 

Camera Trap Action

I recently set up a white-flash camera trap on the waterhole in my backyard.  The difference between this camera and other traditional camera traps is that it uses a white-flash, just like your camera flash, to capture the photo or video of the animals when the motion sensor is triggered.  Many camera traps, including several of mine, use IR, or infrared light to capture the action of the animals.  Infrared light is not visible to you and me or wildlife.  Because of this the camera can be triggered and the action captured without the animal being startled by seeing white light.  The risk of using a white-light flash with a camera trap is that the animal will see it and run away.

Here is an example of a non-visible IR camera trap capture:

In this case, the animals were revealed by the infrared light, but they did not see any light and everything remained dark for them.

In the following video my camera used a white-light flash to capture the action.  This is the same as using a flash on a DSLR in low light to catch everyone’s smiles.  Since the animals can see this, it often startles them thus changing their behavior.

In my back yard it seems the animals are adjusting to the white light when they approach the waterhole:

Catching up, moving forward

Mount Lemmon. Copyright: Greg Joder
Mount Lemmon. Copyright: Greg Joder

Yes, I’m still dealing with post-election depression, facing the fact that the president elect’s views and cabinet choices will do their best to destroy nature in return for profit. A lot of damage can be done in four years.  There is a lot of talk about de-regulation and fewer rules.  Given that the GOP will control all three branches, it’s a no-brainer that many important and functioning environmental rules and acts will be cut or debilitated.  Under the next GOP-led administration, say goodbye to the Endangered Species Act, clean air and clean water (EPA).  Not to mention back-peddling on women’s rights, equal pay, pro-choice and public schools.

I despised G. W. Bush, but the next administration promises to be much much worse.

I recognize that I may lose what little viewer-ship I have by stating my opinion here, but that’s OK by me.

For those of you that stick around, thank you!

Here’s the latest… Lot’s of action at the backyard waterhole:

And, chasing a train: