Crazy Birds

While out and about in Costa Rica I was able to spy some pretty interesting birds. The distinguishing features for my favorites are their plumage colors and unique tail feathers. My favorite sighting was a quetzal in the family Trogonidae. I spotted the bird above us, but it was my hiking partner who was able to capture the better image of the bird before it flew off. Diego said this was one of only a handful of sightings in several years in that location.

A male quetzal. Copyright: Diego Lobo.

The next bird with beautiful plumage and unique tail feathers is a motmot. I think this one is a Blue-crowned motmot. Look at those tail feathers!

Blue-crowned motmot. Family ‎Momotidae. Copyright: Greg Joder.

The last fascinating bird I spotted was near my room. This one is in the family Cuculidae and is a squirrel cuckoo. As you can see, its distinguishing feature are its extra-long tail feathers with notable white tips.

Squirrel cuckoo (Piaya cayana). Copyright: Greg Joder.

 

 

Costa Rica on a Whim

The New Year brought me to Costa Rica for a short reboot. Hoping to start 2019 on a clear and heart-felt path. While most of my adventures have to do with nature, conservation and wildlife, this trip is focused on health and well-being. However, that hasn’t stopped my curiosity and desire to explore the natural world around me. Granted, I know very little about Costa Rican biodiversity, so the photos below have only the simplest of descriptions.

A few orchids:

A few insects:

I did not have my good DSLR, so the few bird photos I’ve taken so far are not that great:

Red passion flower. Copyright: Greg Joder.

 

 

 

Hummingbird Nest in the Patio

This little Broad-billed Hummingbird is likely the same one that built a nest in my patio last summer. Either way, she was able to successfully fledge two youngsters. There were plenty of hanging-plant options on which to build her nest, but she chose the green hook.

During her time incubating the eggs and feeding the nestlings the temperature in the patio was between 100 and 111 degrees (38 to 44 c.).  She had her work cut out for her.

Here she is incubating her eggs:

Here she is feeding her kids a few days before they fledged:

Hummingbird Nest Update

The little female Broad-billed Hummingbird continues to incubate her two eggs. She also performs a lot of nest maintenance each day, adding more material or adjusting what she already has.  In order to capture still images of her I set up my DSLR on a tripod with telephoto and on time-lapse, shooting one photo every minute.  Here are three of the best captures:

It’s hot out! Copyright: Greg Joder.
Nest material. Copyright: Greg Joder
Hunkered down. Copyright: Greg Joder.