Hummingbird Nest in the Patio

This little Broad-billed Hummingbird is likely the same one that built a nest in my patio last summer. Either way, she was able to successfully fledge two youngsters. There were plenty of hanging-plant options on which to build her nest, but she chose the green hook.

During her time incubating the eggs and feeding the nestlings the temperature in the patio was between 100 and 111 degrees (38 to 44 c.).  She had her work cut out for her.

Here she is incubating her eggs:

Here she is feeding her kids a few days before they fledged:

Lots of Mountain Lions

The camera traps I’ve set up have captured some very nice mountain lion activity.  The following two videos show two different mountain lion families some 20 miles apart.

The first video is from Cat Canyon:

The second video is from Lion Wash, which I have had camera stationed on and off for over two years:

Sphinx Moth Caterpillars

This spring I planted several Sacred Datura plants hoping to attract Sphinx moths.  The trick worked and now there are a dozen or so Sphinx moth caterpillars pretty much defoliating one of the Datura plants.

Sphinx moth caterpillar on Datura. Copyright: Greg Joder.

Hummingbird Nest Update

The little female Broad-billed Hummingbird continues to incubate her two eggs. She also performs a lot of nest maintenance each day, adding more material or adjusting what she already has.  In order to capture still images of her I set up my DSLR on a tripod with telephoto and on time-lapse, shooting one photo every minute.  Here are three of the best captures:

It’s hot out! Copyright: Greg Joder.
Nest material. Copyright: Greg Joder
Hunkered down. Copyright: Greg Joder.

Monsoons

After what seemed an eternity of dry hot weather, the monsoons have finally arrived.

This is the time the desert plants and animals become more active and the Sonoran Desert morphs into a living terrarium with the simple addition of rain. Because of this it is my favorite time of year, despite the high temps and humidity.

This afternoon I set two new camera traps in a mountain range SE of Tucson. On the way to the sites I had selected I came across some common, but beautiful insects:

Figeater beetle, Cotinis mutabilis. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Pepsis wasp/tarantula hawk. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Queen butterfly. Copyright: Greg Joder.

Summer

It’s been a long few months since finishing my tour on Sea Sheperd’s Operation Milagro. I worked on-board as a deckhand hauling in illegal nets, briefly as quartermaster on the bridge and primarily as one of a few drone operators.  Here’s is Operation Milagro’s season end recap video:

During this time my dad passed away and I spent a few week back in Tucson with family.  I officially left the Sea Shepherd campaign after my three month commitment ended at the end of April.  At that point I needed a break to re-energize and reflect on the loss of my dad.

Since that time, I’ve been back in Tucson working on my house and volunteering again at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.  I’ve also been catching up with my wildlife camera-trap projects at home, the Catalina Mountains and at the Audubon’s Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch.  I’ll be posting regularly now that things have settled down.

Here’s the best so far from a camera in my yard:

Here’s another mountain lion from one of my Catalina Mountain cameras:

A bear showed up at the Audubon research ranch: