Hummingbird Nest Update

The little hummingbird continues to incubate her two eggs.  Based on information I’ve read the incubation period is nearing its end and soon her offspring will hatch.  In the meantime, she patiently sits and waits for her kids to crack open their eggs and begin begging for food.

Broad-billed Hummingbird on Nest. Copyright: Greg Joder.

more nest building and first egg!

Yesterday the little hummingbird continued working hard building her nest.  She’s using small twigs, leaves, grass seeds and spider silk among other things.  Both of the following videos are best viewed in HD and full screen.  Here’s yesterdays action:

And here is today’s action.  More nest building and her first egg:

I have been keeping a small jar with fur from my dog Ham (now in doggy heaven). This morning I decided to attach some of her fur to a piece of wire and hang it in the flight path of the nesting hummingbird. Sure enough, she found it and started using it in her nest:

Monsoons

After what seemed an eternity of dry hot weather, the monsoons have finally arrived.

This is the time the desert plants and animals become more active and the Sonoran Desert morphs into a living terrarium with the simple addition of rain. Because of this it is my favorite time of year, despite the high temps and humidity.

This afternoon I set two new camera traps in a mountain range SE of Tucson. On the way to the sites I had selected I came across some common, but beautiful insects:

Figeater beetle, Cotinis mutabilis. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Pepsis wasp/tarantula hawk. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Queen butterfly. Copyright: Greg Joder.

More Wildlife

Despite the recent absence from my blog I have continued to capture photos and videos of things that interest me.  Most recently, I’ve been focused on Sonoran Desert nature.  Here are some favorite videos from the last few weeks.

Western Screech Owl and a Red-spotted Toad:

A Datura bloom time-lapse:

A Desert Kingsnake:

Round-tailed ground Squirrel Family:

 

Tropical Storm Newton

Tropical Storm Newton recently passed through Tucson and it dropped a lot of water on the way.  Enough that some washes flowed.  The storm also brought in lost pelagic seabirds from the Sea of Cortez, like the Least Storm-Petrel.  The Tucson Wildlife Center took in two petrels. Both did not make it as they had simply run out of gas.  Here is their Press Release: Sea of Cortez Petrels.