Camera Trap Action

I recently set up a white-flash camera trap on the waterhole in my backyard.  The difference between this camera and other traditional camera traps is that it uses a white-flash, just like your camera flash, to capture the photo or video of the animals when the motion sensor is triggered.  Many camera traps, including several of mine, use IR, or infrared light to capture the action of the animals.  Infrared light is not visible to you and me or wildlife.  Because of this the camera can be triggered and the action captured without the animal being startled by seeing white light.  The risk of using a white-light flash with a camera trap is that the animal will see it and run away.

Here is an example of a non-visible IR camera trap capture:

In this case, the animals were revealed by the infrared light, but they did not see any light and everything remained dark for them.

In the following video my camera used a white-light flash to capture the action.  This is the same as using a flash on a DSLR in low light to catch everyone’s smiles.  Since the animals can see this, it often startles them thus changing their behavior.

In my back yard it seems the animals are adjusting to the white light when they approach the waterhole:

Catching up, moving forward

Mount Lemmon. Copyright: Greg Joder
Mount Lemmon. Copyright: Greg Joder

Yes, I’m still dealing with post-election depression, facing the fact that the president elect’s views and cabinet choices will do their best to destroy nature in return for profit. A lot of damage can be done in four years.  There is a lot of talk about de-regulation and fewer rules.  Given that the GOP will control all three branches, it’s a no-brainer that many important and functioning environmental rules and acts will be cut or debilitated.  Under the next GOP-led administration, say goodbye to the Endangered Species Act, clean air and clean water (EPA).  Not to mention back-peddling on women’s rights, equal pay, pro-choice and public schools.

I despised G. W. Bush, but the next administration promises to be much much worse.

I recognize that I may lose what little viewer-ship I have by stating my opinion here, but that’s OK by me.

For those of you that stick around, thank you!

Here’s the latest… Lot’s of action at the backyard waterhole:

And, chasing a train:

Audubon Research Ranch Camera Traps

Two days ago I checked my camera traps at the Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch of the National Audubon Society with my friend Rene.  On the way to a location where I have two camera traps we found a freshly dead deer:

Dead white-tailed deer buck.  Copyright:  Greg Joder.
Dead white-tailed deer buck. Copyright: Greg Joder.

It became apparent to us that the deer had not been brought down by a predator, so we reported our find to the Research Ranch management.  At this point all we know is that AZ Game and Fish is investigating. Coincident to this, my two trail cameras that were within a few-hundred meters of the dead deer were missing the SD cards.  A frustrating loss of a months-worth of images/activity.  Given that there is both illegal hunting and drug smuggling in the area, there’s no telling who stole the camera cards or who killed the deer.

Despite this, my other cameras on the Research Ranch captured some fun images:

Red-tailed Hawk.  Copyright:  Greg Joder.
Red-tailed Hawk. Copyright: Greg Joder.
American Kestrel.  Copyright:  Greg Joder.
American Kestrel. Copyright: Greg Joder.

Here is a time-lapse of the Red-tailed Hawk taking a bath:

 

Great Purple Hairstreak!

Great Purple Hairstreak. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Great Purple Hairstreak. Copyright: Greg Joder.

There have been a number of Great Purple Hairstreak Butterflies have been visiting the Desert Broom in my yard.  In the following video, notice how it moves its wings as it moves over the flowers drinking nectar. Love how they look like antennae, confusing predators:

Desert Broom

There are several Desert Broom shrubs blooming in my yard.  This plant blooms in the fall, well after the monsoon wildflowers do.  Like last year, I’ve been reminded that a plethora of insects love this plant:

Queen Butterfly on Desert Broom. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Queen Butterfly on Desert Broom. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Snout Butterfly on Desert Broom. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Snout Butterfly on Desert Broom. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Katydid on Desert Broom. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Katydid on Desert Broom. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Metalark Butterfly Species on Desert Broom. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Metalark Butterfly Species on Desert Broom. Copyright: Greg Joder.

Moab, Utah – A birds-eye View

On my way back to Tucson from Boulder I spent a day in Moab, Utah. Usually, when I pass through Moab I take a lot of photos, but this time felt compelled to capture aerial scenes.  In the following video there are clips of the Wall Street climbing area (great sport and crack climbing), Negro Bill Canyon (Outstanding riparian area with lots of biodiversity and a natural arch at the end) and the Colorado River (Great flat water for SUP, kayak and rafting):

Boulder October

Backlit Aspen Leaf. Nederland, Colorado. Copyright: Greg Joder
Back-lit Aspen Leaf. Nederland, Colorado. Copyright: Greg Joder

I made a quick trip to Boulder, Colorado where I spent time with friends and exploring my old stomping grounds.  I rode my mountain bike through the ranch which is now Open Space.  This brought up feelings of joy, pain, loss and wonder…  The old sign still hangs at the entrance:

Joder Ranch Open Space. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Joder Ranch Open Space. Copyright: Greg Joder.

I also spent time up in Nederland, Colorado and was able to make an aerial flight over Barker Reservoir and the Town:

And there was new snow in the high country:

Mount Audubon. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Mount Audubon. Copyright: Greg Joder.

caterpillar ~ chrysalis ~ butterfly

The queen butterfly chrysalis that I’ve been watching went through another stage of metamorphosis this morning (video below).

Queen butterfly chrysalis. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Queen butterfly chrysalis. Copyright: Greg Joder.

This time from chrysalis (pupa) to butterfly. It took 9 days for the chrysalis to go through the cell growth and differentiation to become an adult butterfly. Visually, we can see the morphological changes which is magical in itself.  What we can’t see are the changes the insect goes through on a cellular level, from larva to pupa and pupa to butterfly. The next photo, taken late at night before the complete metamorphosis, shows the chrysalis clearing to reveal the nearly developed adult butterfly.  The video of the whole process follows.

Chrysalis metamorphosis. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Chrysalis metamorphosis. Copyright: Greg Joder.

Watching this process I’ve been wondering if the ‘mind’ of the insect remains intact through the whole process: did it know it was a caterpillar, then a chrysalis before becoming a butterfly? Please watch the following video in HD and full screen for best detail.  To see the butterfly emerge from the chrysalis, skip to the 4:00 minute mark.

Adult butterfly emerges from its chrysalis. Copyright: Greg Joder.
Adult butterfly emerges from its chrysalis. Copyright: Greg Joder.